Garden Update #7- June 2014

I’ve finally made my way back into the garden – permanently this time.

I lost interest in it after Alf died – it made me too sad.

I watered it occasionally, and cut the grass infrequently, but that was about it.

Alf was very proud of what I’d achieved, and was always showing it off to our visitors, or watching what I was doing from our balcony. I miss him, and gardening reminded me too much of him.

Anyway, I’ve decided that it’s about time that I get off the couch, get stuck into it, and continue to make Alf proud.

Plus I can hear him say “Don’t you dare let that garden die – do you know how much we’ve spent on it!!!”

Luckily I planted a low-maintenance garden, otherwise I’d be in big trouble after ignoring it for six months! Good news is, nothing died, and everything kept right on growing. In some cases, a bit too much!

Square Foot Garden Bed

I dug up the bed as the soil had compacted and was rock hard.

I then added a mix of composted horse/chicken manure, perlite and coco peat, and dug that into each square.

The only things still there from last year were a straggly thyme plant, spring onions, half-dead oregano, and strawberries.

The original strawberry plants had died, but I transplanted about 20 new small plants that had grown from runners.

I’ve planted parsley, chilli, mint, thyme and sage seedlings, and I’ve sown the following seeds:

Capsicum (peppers)
Beef steak tomatoes
Roma tomatoes
Celery
Sugar snap and snow peas
Bush beans
Silverbeet (Swiss chard)
English spinach
Lettuces (including Cos for Caesar salads!)

Again, I’ve only planted things that are expensive or not available here.

I have six empty squares which I’ll use to plant more salad vegetables in a few weeks’ time, so that I get a staggered supply rather than have everything maturing at once.

And I’ve moved my cement statue into the middle of the bed – she adds height, colour and interest to the empty bed.

SFG BedAerial ViewUsing Compost as Mulch

One of the reasons the SFG bed was so dry (ignoring my bad watering practices for the moment!), was because last year I mulched it with the horse/chicken compost we bought.

The compost was either hydrophobic and repelled water, or it absorbed the water, and just held on to it.

I’m not sure which, but either way, it prevented water from reaching the soil.

I’m glad I’ve discovered that now, as I plan on mulching the entire garden with it at some stage.

As an experiment, I’ve soaked it in water, along with perlite and coco peat, and mulched the planter on the garage roof with it. This planter is in full sun for most of the day and dries out quickly, so I’ll soon be able to tell whether it’s effective or not.

Raw ingredients

Dry mix

Mulch

Soaked in water

Passionfruit

After almost 2 years, I have fruit! Only a couple, but it’s a start:

Lack of fruit on the vine can be due to insufficient water, so I’ve given it a good soaking, and used the mulch mix around the base of the vine to stop evaporation.

Passionfruit

What a beauty!

It’s been so long since I bought it, I can’t remember whether it was a yellow or purple variety – hope it’s purple – yellow clashes with the wall colour!

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Shopping for Manure Mauritian-Style

We needed manure to add to the compost, so this morning we visited the Mont Choisy chicken farm, situated at the horse riding school, in the hope that they had some for sale.

Well, who would have guessed that buying manure would be such a nice experience – we had to wait for the woman in charge to come back to her office, so we took a little stroll through the grounds…

Main house

Entrance to the main house

Worker

She did smile at us afterwards – think she was just camera-shy!

Alf and a horse

You even get to pat a horse or two, and chat to the stablehands

We were sent off down a track to load the bags of manure into the car – we anticipated driving home with all the windows down, and our heads hanging out to escape the smell.

But instead we found ourselves surrounded by mounds of a well-composted horse and chicken manure mix – no smell at all.

Hills of poop!

Hills of poop!

Pre-packed bags

Pre-packed bags

Back at the shop/office, we grabbed a tray of eggs and some free-range chicken breasts, and home we went…

Lime kiln

…past an old lime kiln…

Driveway

…and through the banyan trees (I think) lining the driveway

On the way home, we stopped at our local beach for some seaweed, but there wasn’t any:

Trou aux Biches beach

A very clean Trou aux Biches beach

What a pleasant way to while away an hour – sure beats going to the hardware store!

La Ferme de Mont Choisy Opening Hours:

Mon, Tue, Wed, Fri: 8.30 – 11am and 12 – 3pm

Thu: 8.30 – 11am and 12.30 – 3pm

2. Compost Materials and Ratios

 For effective composting, you need a combination of dry and green waste.

Another direct quote from BH&G, Australia:

“There should be 25-30 times more carbon than nitrogen for it to work well.

What’s high in carbon? Woody prunings (chopped small), shredded paper, fallen leaves.

What’s high in nitrogen? Grass clippings, green plants, old flowers, manure, fruit and veggie scraps.”

Our green waste will include:

  • kitchen scraps
  • old bunches of flowers
  • fresh prunings and weeds from the garden
  • grass clippings (or, in our case, swathes of long grass)
  • seaweed to bulk out the green waste, as between the two of us, we don’t eat enough fruit and vegetables to have a lot of kitchen scraps (though with Alf being Irish, we always have a lot of potato peelings!)

And our dry waste:

  • torn newspaper
  • coffee grounds
  • dead banana leaves (but I won’t use the trunks as they’re too slimy)
  • fallen leaves from next door’s mango and Coeur de Boeuf trees
  • sawdust for extra “carbon”, if required
  • crushed eggshells (though if we don’t get worms in the compost, I don’t know whether they’ll break down, so I’m not sure yet if I will add them)

If you have access to it, animal manure (cow, chicken etc) makes an excellent addition, and speeds up the decomposition process, as will chopping everything up as small as possible.

I haven’t looked for chook (chicken) poo yet, but will start asking around – someone told me there’s an organic chicken farm in Mon Choisy, so I’ll make that my first stop (though if it’s fresh, the car might get rather stinky!).

(One thing I regret not doing back in Australia, was buying some Zoo Poo – the idea makes me laugh – spreading (well-rotted, not fresh!) elephant or giraffe poo around the garden! I love it!)

Ashes from wood fires is also good to add, but we don’t have any.

Things that DON’T go into the Compost

  • Diseased plants
  • Dog and cat poo
  • Meat, fish, dairy products
  • Fried foods and salads dressed with oil
  • Glossy magazines
  • excessive amounts of citrus peel or onions (though how much is too much?)

So, more trial and error ahead.

Hopefully, one day, I’ll actually know what I’m doing!