3. Layering, Watering, and Turning the Compost Pile

Layering your Compost Materials

Yet another BH&G quote:

“The ideal way to build your compost pile is to fill your bin all at once, with a 15cm layer of one material, then a sprinkling of activator (blood and bone or poultry manure), a layer of something different, more activator and so on until you reach the top.

Water as you go to keep the material moist, but not soggy, then thatch the whole thing with a layer of straw.

Once it’s done, start a new pile.

You need about a cubic metre of material to achieve a critical mass.”

Well, we don’t have that much waste (and there’s no straw here at all, as far as I know), so I’m just adding to it as I can with whatever we have on the day.

Also, I don’t really want compost bins all over the place – not a good look in a small garden – one’s bad enough!

Unfortunately, I just lost my source of fallen leaves – the neighbours decided to prune their coeur-de-boeuf (corossol) tree, Mauritian-style – meaning they hacked at it with a machete:

Massacred treeAlong with the fallen leaves, the shade for the side bed disappeared, as did our privacy screen – from upstairs, we can see straight into their front yard, and they can see us right back – we now wave to each other a lot!

Oh well – it’ll grow back eventually!

Watering

The compost needs to be kept moist but not wet.

I’m giving it a light spray every couple of days – but may need to adjust this as the weather heats up.

Turning the Compost

Final quote:

“Turning compost mixes the ingredients, aerates the pile and speeds up the process.
For fast compost: Turn the pile every three days for two weeks, then leave the pile undisturbed for another week.

Hey presto! Compost in three weeks.
For lazy compost: Turn the pile every six weeks to three months. You’ll have compost in six months.

Don’t turn it more than suggested here, or the pile won’t rot at all.”

My Experience to Date

Initially, I was going with the lazy compost method, but I’ve decided 6 months is a bit too long to wait.

So I started turning the pile last week – the stuff at the bottom was black but very soggy, so I added more chopped-up dead banana leaves to compensate.

Turning the compostI’ve since added the chicken/horse manure blend, and mixed it through.

At one stage there were weird-looking mushrooms growing in it (not a good sign, I imagine), and it had an unpleasant rotting smell – I figured it was too wet, so added some sawdust and dry leaves, and the smell disappeared.

Another time, I think it was too dry, as a colony of red ants moved in – water got rid of them.

I still haven’t seen any worms – I’m starting to think that maybe there really aren’t any in Mauritius.

Anyway, no huge disasters so far – we’ll see what I end up with in a few weeks time.

Any and all tips are welcome!

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